Author Archives: Andy Nicholson

East Midlands History & Heritage magazine issue 4 out now!

The latest edition of East Midlands History & Heritage magazine includes the following articles:
  • Thomas Hemsworth and Ashbourne Malt by Peter Collinge
  • ‘It is on the lives of infants that unhealthy influences have their deadliest effects’: Combating  Infant mortality in Nottingham and Leicester, 1890-1910 by Denise Amos
  • Supporting king and constitution: expressions of loyalism in Leicestershire, 1792-3 by Pamela J Fisher
  • 1916: The perspectives of a Lincolnshire home front poet by Andrew Jackson
  • Cavendish Bridge The 70th anniversary of a 20th-century disaster by Jenni Dobson
  • Fieldwalking with Leicestershire Fieldworkers by Kathleen E Elkin
  • The workhouse: a lasting legacy by Katherine Onion and Samantha Ball
  • The Militia Lists and family history by Matthew McCormack

Read the magazine ….

East Midlands History & Heritage Magazine, Issue 3 out now!

magazine-vol-3--coverThe latest edition of East Midlands History & Heritage magazine has the theme of ‘hidden voices’ and articles include:
  • Battle-scarred: Surgery, medicine and military welfare during the British Civil Wars
  • “Slave-trade legacies: The colour of money”: Nottingham-based Heritage Project, finalist for National Lottery Awards 2016
  • Voices from the past: The search for medieval graffiti in Derbyshire & Nottinghamshire
  • Asylums at war: Duston War Hospital, 1916-1919
  • Silent voices of the Lincolnshire poor
  • The Pentrich Revolution Bicentenary 1817 – 2017 and the strange case of ‘Oliver the Spy’
  • ‘For those women have got pluck’: The Women’s Social and Political Union in Loughborough
  • What is happening at Delapré Abbey and why do we need you?
  • Step back in time at the 1620s House and Garden, Donington le Heath
  • Menace or inconvenience? Nottingham City’s response to the 1913 Mental Deficiency Act
  • Night tales: The incident of the Rufford Park Poachers

Read the magazine ….

Explore a virtual 19th century Nottingham textile factory at Sneinton on 9 July

victorian-textile-factory

Image courtesy of the Backlit Gallery

The Backlit Gallery in Sneinton is hosting a ‘immersive Virtual Reality experience’ on 9 July. By wearing a VR headset visitors will be able to explore the sights and sounds of the textile factory of I&R Morley as it looked in the late 19th century.

The VR experience is part of a day of events at Backlit on 9 July, from 12 noon to 5pm, which will be devoted to Sneinton and the life and legacy of Samuel Morley (1809-1886), a Nottingham MP, textile manufacturer, social reformer and philanthropist.

The Backlit Gallery is at Alfred House, Ashley Street, Sneinton, Nottingham NG3 1JG.
www.backlit.org.uk
www.morleythreads.com

‘The Labrador Companion’ by Captain George Cartwright

George Cartwright in Labrador

Three years ago, “The Labrador Companion” was discovered in Yorkshire. This is a previously unknown manuscript written by Captain George Cartwright (1739-1819) about his years spent in Labrador.  It is both an instructional text unlike any others related to the early fur trade in eastern North America, and it is also a text about natural history observations.

Cartwright was born at the manor house in Marnham, on the banks of the River Trent in Nottinghamshire, and went on to become a pioneer settler in Labrador in the far north east of Canada. He was nick-named ‘Labrador’ Cartwright having lived for nearly 16 years in these sub-arctic lands hunting and collecting animals and skins for export.

This annotated edition, published by McGill-Queen’s University Press, transcribes ‘The Labrador Companion’ in full. Cartwright documented the everyday work of Labrador’s particular kind of fur-trade life based on his experiences operating a series of merchant stations in southern Labrador between 1770 and 1786.

http://www.mqup.ca/george-cartwright—s-the-labrador-companion-products-9780773548060.php?page_id=105621&#!prettyPhoto

The Lincolnshire Landscape by Jon Fox

lincs-landscapesA new book about the landscape of Lincolnshire has been published recently.

The book ‘explores the diverse landscapes within the historic county, revealing and interpreting both their natural and human heritage in an informative and accessible way.’

The book is available now in bookshops and visitor attractions across Lincolnshire and neighbouring areas, and can also be ordered through the author’s website, www.greenploverbooks.co.uk.

East Midlands History & Heritage Magazine, Issue 2 out!

EMHHDec2015coverA wide variety of historical articles in the latest edition of East Midlands History & Heritage: letters from Charlie Clarke on the Western Front to his girlfriend back in Gainsborough; the trial and execution in 1823 of three men convicted of sodomy; defamation in Nottinghamshire in the early modern period; The Battle of Waterloo and Nottinghamshire’s ‘chosen men’; the Reformatory at Mount St. Bernard in Leicestershire; Magna Carta and the Uffington
Connection; discovering the Archaeology of Rufford Abbey Country Park 2013-2015; the Mayflower Pilgrims
in the East Midlands; Ellerslie House for Paralysed
Sailors and Soldiers in Nottingham.

Read the magazine ….

‘Mine’s a Pint’ exhibition in Gainsborough

beerpotThe Gainsborough Heritage Centre are holding a new exhibition called ‘Mine’s a Pint’ which opens on 28th November and runs till 16th January 2016.

The pubs in Gainsborough were an important part of the cultural aspect of life for workers from the factories of Marshalls and Roses, to the workers who came to Gainsborough, via the busy wharfs and warehouses on the River Trent, to the pubs which ran the length of Bridge Street.

The Centre on 12 North Street is open on Saturdays from 9am until 3pm and the 2nd and 4th Sundays of the month from 11am until 4pm. During the week the Centre is open on Tuesdays from 10am until 3pm. The exhibition entry fee is £1.50 to non-members of the Association. The standard yearly membership fee for members is £10 and the benefit of this is free entry to all of the Centre’s exhibitions.

Further details can be obtained about the Heritage Centre by email: chairman@gainsboroughheritage.com or visit www.gainsboroughheritage.com or call 01427 610526.

Innovation in Museum Displays project

Innovation in Museum Displays was led by Professor Graham Black and Deborah Skinner, lecturers at the Nottingham Trent University Centre for Museum and Heritage Management. They were supported by Stephen LeMottee and Charlotte Pratley, of East Midlands Museums Service.

The aim of Innovation in Museum Displays was to encourage dialogue between the museum and the user and to get visitors talking to each other. The project ran from 2013 and involved eight East Midlands heritage organisations. Although the funding has now ended the project leaders are investigating how to continue to build on this activity. If you would like to stay informed, please sign up to the EMMS mailing list at www.emms.org.uk.

Visit the website for further information:

http://www.innovationinmuseumdisplays.co.uk/

Time Team archaeologist Carenza Lewis leads Lincolnshire dig for teenagers

lincs-diggersAspiring archaeologists have uncovered coins, medieval pottery and animal teeth and bones in a two-day excavation with archaeologist and television presenter Professor Carenza Lewis.

Schoolchildren from across Lincolnshire unearthed the discoveries as part of the Lincolnshire Higher Education Field Academy (HEFA), a new collaboration between the University of Lincoln and the University of Cambridge aimed at school pupils aged 14-17 to raise aspirations for higher education.

The items were found across 10 different dig sites in the Lincolnshire village of Bardney, as 40 schoolchildren from 12 different schools joined Time Team presenter Professor Lewis. The finds will now contribute to important historical research at the University of Lincoln.

The HEFA lasts three days – the first two days were spent excavating, and the final day was held at the University of Lincoln’s main Brayford Pool Campus, when participants evaluated their finds and learned more about studying at degree level.

The Academy is designed to develop pupils’ knowledge, skills and self-confidence through active contribution to new academic research.

Professor Lewis, who joined the University of Lincoln as Professor for Public Understanding of Research in September 2015 and is based in Lincoln’s School of History & Heritage, said: “We are absolutely delighted to be bringing the Higher Education Field Academy to Lincolnshire. This first dig been a great success, with more than 40 local children taking part. It is a wonderful experience for them; getting out of the classroom and piecing history together for themselves.

“This dig has been a fantastic collaborative effort, involving not just the Universities of Lincoln and Cambridge and the schools, but also local history groups and the Bardney village residents who have kindly donated their gardens for us to explore. The students have made important new discoveries about the history of the village while developing knowledge, skills and attitudes which will help them in the future.”

The pupils worked in in small mixed-school teams supervised by Professor Lewis and other experienced archaeologists. The HEFA follows a unique format devised by Professor Lewis in Cambridge in 2005. Lincolnshire teenagers involved in the Bardney excavations now join the ranks of more than 5,000 other teenagers who have taken part in HEFA in East Anglia, more than 90% of whom have rated the experience as good or excellent.

Emily Walton (16), who attends Branston Community Academy near Lincoln, said: “It has been a great experience because when we started digging we found small pieces of pot, but as we got deeper into the ground we were discovering much larger pieces of medieval pottery, glass, metal, and even some animal teeth and bones. It was fascinating to look around at the house and garden we were in because it all looked so modern and pristine, but underneath it there are layers and layers of history.

“In the future I’d love to go to university to study history and archaeology, so this is an ideal experience for me, and it has been lots of fun to meet people from different schools, to work as part of a team and to get out of our comfort zones.”

Take a part of the Northamptonshire archive home!

northantsphotoThe Northamptonshire Archive, based at Wootton Hall Park in Northampton, has launched a range of high quality products featuring selected images from the archive collection.  Exclusively available online , each item is produced to order and delivered to the customer’s address.

Whether it’s a quirky mug, some Christm
as cards or a beautiful framed print, there is something to suit all budgets.  Images currently available include vintage maps and Victorian Christmas cards – although the range will be extended.

The range can be seen at www.redbubble.com/people/northantspast