Author Archives: Andy Nicholson

Time Team archaeologist Carenza Lewis leads Lincolnshire dig for teenagers

lincs-diggersAspiring archaeologists have uncovered coins, medieval pottery and animal teeth and bones in a two-day excavation with archaeologist and television presenter Professor Carenza Lewis.

Schoolchildren from across Lincolnshire unearthed the discoveries as part of the Lincolnshire Higher Education Field Academy (HEFA), a new collaboration between the University of Lincoln and the University of Cambridge aimed at school pupils aged 14-17 to raise aspirations for higher education.

The items were found across 10 different dig sites in the Lincolnshire village of Bardney, as 40 schoolchildren from 12 different schools joined Time Team presenter Professor Lewis. The finds will now contribute to important historical research at the University of Lincoln.

The HEFA lasts three days – the first two days were spent excavating, and the final day was held at the University of Lincoln’s main Brayford Pool Campus, when participants evaluated their finds and learned more about studying at degree level.

The Academy is designed to develop pupils’ knowledge, skills and self-confidence through active contribution to new academic research.

Professor Lewis, who joined the University of Lincoln as Professor for Public Understanding of Research in September 2015 and is based in Lincoln’s School of History & Heritage, said: “We are absolutely delighted to be bringing the Higher Education Field Academy to Lincolnshire. This first dig been a great success, with more than 40 local children taking part. It is a wonderful experience for them; getting out of the classroom and piecing history together for themselves.

“This dig has been a fantastic collaborative effort, involving not just the Universities of Lincoln and Cambridge and the schools, but also local history groups and the Bardney village residents who have kindly donated their gardens for us to explore. The students have made important new discoveries about the history of the village while developing knowledge, skills and attitudes which will help them in the future.”

The pupils worked in in small mixed-school teams supervised by Professor Lewis and other experienced archaeologists. The HEFA follows a unique format devised by Professor Lewis in Cambridge in 2005. Lincolnshire teenagers involved in the Bardney excavations now join the ranks of more than 5,000 other teenagers who have taken part in HEFA in East Anglia, more than 90% of whom have rated the experience as good or excellent.

Emily Walton (16), who attends Branston Community Academy near Lincoln, said: “It has been a great experience because when we started digging we found small pieces of pot, but as we got deeper into the ground we were discovering much larger pieces of medieval pottery, glass, metal, and even some animal teeth and bones. It was fascinating to look around at the house and garden we were in because it all looked so modern and pristine, but underneath it there are layers and layers of history.

“In the future I’d love to go to university to study history and archaeology, so this is an ideal experience for me, and it has been lots of fun to meet people from different schools, to work as part of a team and to get out of our comfort zones.”

Take a part of the Northamptonshire archive home!

northantsphotoThe Northamptonshire Archive, based at Wootton Hall Park in Northampton, has launched a range of high quality products featuring selected images from the archive collection.  Exclusively available online , each item is produced to order and delivered to the customer’s address.

Whether it’s a quirky mug, some Christm
as cards or a beautiful framed print, there is something to suit all budgets.  Images currently available include vintage maps and Victorian Christmas cards – although the range will be extended.

The range can be seen at www.redbubble.com/people/northantspast

Grave slab of Robert de Markham rediscovered

rufford-abbeyThe grave slab of a medieval monk who was buried at Rufford Abbey in Nottinghamshire has been rediscovered in English Heritage’s national collection store at Wrest Park in Bedfordshire.

The decorated slab commemorates Robert de Markham and dates from 1399. It was removed from the chapel at Rufford Abbey in the 1950s when the building was partially demolished.

Further details from the BBC Nottingham website.

‘The Gunpowder Plot’ at Boughton House, Northants

gunpowder-plotNorthamptonshire’s Boughton House is reaffirming its role as the home of Bonfire Night with the return of sell-out show, The Gunpowder Plot.

Tickets have gone on sale in September for the Estate’s third annual spectacle of performance, projection and pyrotechnics in November.

The centuries old tradition of thanksgiving was reinstated on Bonfire Night at Boughton House in 2013 in tribute to Edward, First Lord Montagu of Boughton- the father of Bonfire Night.

Edward personally sponsored legislation known as The Observance of 5th November Act 1605, which called for an annual thanksgiving for the failure of The Plot to assassinate King James I of England – setting in motion a tradition which has spanned centuries.

The Estate, home now to Edward’s descendant, the Duke of Buccleuch, will become a backdrop to the event telling the thrilling story of Northamptonshire’s infamous conspirators, as the production, in association with Northamptonshire County Council and Leicester-based theatre innovators METRO-BOULOT-DODO, returns on November 5th, 6th and 7th.

The Gunpowder Plot takes place at Boughton Estate on November 5th, 6th and 7th. Tickets are on sale from Royal and Derngate (www.royalandderngate.co.uk) priced at £12.50 per adult and £8 for concessions.

For more information on upcoming events at Boughton House, visit www.boughtonhouse.co.uk.

 

Gainsborough Heritage Centre: Work Hard Play Hard Exhibition

Gainsborough-Heritage-Centr

Gainsborough Heritage Centre

The Gainsborough Heritage Centre are holding a new exhibition called Work Hard Play Hard which will be starting on 26th September. This exhibition will showcase the sports played by local people, including teams from the Marshalls and Roses factories. The sports this exhibition will be exploring are football, cycling, tennis, cricket, hockey, golf, bowls and much more. Sport has always been a popular form of recreation within the town so come along and see if you can spot a relative or two.

The Centre on 12 North Street is open on Saturdays from 9am until 3pm and the 2nd and 4th Sundays of the month from 11am until 4pm. During the week the Centre is open on Tuesdays from 10am until 3pm. The exhibition entry fee is £1.50 to non-members of the Association. The standard yearly membership fee for members is £10 and the benefit of this is free entry to all of the Centre’s exhibitions.

Further details can be obtained about the Heritage Centre by email: chairman@gainsboroughheritage.com or visit www.gainsboroughheritage.com or call 01427 610526.

Write for us!

scribeFollowing the successful launch of the first edition of our magazine this summer, we are now planning issue two, which will appear around Christmas. This is an open call. Unlike issue one, which focussed on the English Civil War, and issue three (mid 2016), which will adopt the theme of ‘Hidden Voices’, every second issue of the magazine will take contributions on any topic relating to the history and heritage of the East Midlands area.

We’re looking for stories of between 2,000-2,500 words long, and news events/notices of up to 500 words. The cut-off date is mid Nov 2015. We actively encourage the inclusion of images, artwork, etc. Imagine a History Today for the East Midlands.

Please look at the East Midlands History & Heritage Style Sheet below before you start.

Please email with any questions/queries.

Nick Hayes (editor)

emhist@virginmedia.com

Download document (PDF)

The Montagu Monuments

montagumon

© Copyright Richard Croft and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

Four world-class marble sculptures in St Edmund’s Church in Warkton, Northamptonshire, that commemorate members of the Montagu family, have been restored following a year-long £500,000 project managed by The Prince’s Regeneration Trust.

Two of them were created by Louis Francois Roubiliac, who is considered to have been one of the greatest sculptors working in 18th century England.

The church will be open every Thursday from 10am to 2pm (and at the same times every day in August except for Sundays) throughout 2015 to allow the public to view the stunning pieces of art in all their restored glory.

Roman Southwell Gladiator Ale launched

gladiator-aleWelbeck Abbey Brewery is sponsoring the Roman Southwell Project by producing a special limited edition beer. The ‘Gladiator Ale’ will be a traditional pale ale made with British barley and Boudicea hops. The beer, which will be 3.8% ABV, will be available in local pubs in Southwell in late June.

The beer will also be available in an eight-pack case priced just £20 from late July onwards. Proceeds from the sales of the beer will go towards funding Phase Three of the project, due to start in October.

See the Roman Southwell Project website for more information.

Kings Clipstone Research Project

kingsclipstoneRunning for over 11 years now, the Kings Clipstone Research Project is now in the midst of its busiest year ever. The project is studying the landscape and built environment of the largest royal palace ever to have been constructed in Mediaeval England.

With a huge ground penetrating radar survey carried out this spring, 2015 will see over four weeks of excavation work taking place organised alongside Mercian Archaeological Services CIC and the Sherwood Forest Trust. There are plenty of volunteer and student placements available.

For more information on the project visit the Kings Clipstone Research Project Facebook page.

Mortality, Care and Military Welfare during the British Civil Wars

Healthcare1630s

Detail from ‘The Hospital’ by Jacques Callot (1633)

An international conference organised by the University of Leicester’s Centre for English Local History will celebrate the opening of the National Civil War Centre at Newark Museum, Nottinghamshire, on 7-8 August 2015. The conference will examine care and military welfare during the British Civil Wars, embracing themes such as hospitals, medicine, surgery, nursing, disease, wounds, maimed soldiers, war widows and orphans. It will also focus on the costs of these wars, as well as the social memory and lasting scars of this important series of conflicts. The conference also celebrates the establishment of a Wolfson Foundation Research Centre for Care, Welfare and Medicine during the British Civil Wars based at Newark Museum and in partnership with the University of Leicester.

Organiser Dr Andrew Hopper from Leicester University’s Centre for English Local History said:

“Some of the measures put in place during the civil war seem astonishingly modern.  Parliament led the way and its welfare provision care could be seen as both enlightened thinking, but also an inducement to fight for its cause.  It was certainly not a universal system. Pension rights were not extended to those who fought for the King – a situation reversed when King Charles II assumed the throne.  He also dismantled the military hospital structure and refused to accept the state’s duty for the welfare of its army, putting responsibility back upon parish poor relief and charities.”

For a full programme and information on how to register for one or both days visit www2.le.ac.uk/conference or email Dr Andrew Hopper at ajh69@le.ac.uk.

The £50 registration fee for both days includes free entry to the NCWC, buffet lunch and refreshments, and wine and real ale receptions thanks to support from Midland History and Springhead Brewery.

More information at: www.nationalcivilwarcentre.com

Twitter: @civilwarcentre

www.facebook.com/NationalCivilWarCentre