Author Archives: Andy Nicholson

Grave slab of Robert de Markham rediscovered

rufford-abbeyThe grave slab of a medieval monk who was buried at Rufford Abbey in Nottinghamshire has been rediscovered in English Heritage’s national collection store at Wrest Park in Bedfordshire.

The decorated slab commemorates Robert de Markham and dates from 1399. It was removed from the chapel at Rufford Abbey in the 1950s when the building was partially demolished.

Further details from the BBC Nottingham website.

‘The Gunpowder Plot’ at Boughton House, Northants

gunpowder-plotNorthamptonshire’s Boughton House is reaffirming its role as the home of Bonfire Night with the return of sell-out show, The Gunpowder Plot.

Tickets have gone on sale in September for the Estate’s third annual spectacle of performance, projection and pyrotechnics in November.

The centuries old tradition of thanksgiving was reinstated on Bonfire Night at Boughton House in 2013 in tribute to Edward, First Lord Montagu of Boughton- the father of Bonfire Night.

Edward personally sponsored legislation known as The Observance of 5th November Act 1605, which called for an annual thanksgiving for the failure of The Plot to assassinate King James I of England – setting in motion a tradition which has spanned centuries.

The Estate, home now to Edward’s descendant, the Duke of Buccleuch, will become a backdrop to the event telling the thrilling story of Northamptonshire’s infamous conspirators, as the production, in association with Northamptonshire County Council and Leicester-based theatre innovators METRO-BOULOT-DODO, returns on November 5th, 6th and 7th.

The Gunpowder Plot takes place at Boughton Estate on November 5th, 6th and 7th. Tickets are on sale from Royal and Derngate (www.royalandderngate.co.uk) priced at £12.50 per adult and £8 for concessions.

For more information on upcoming events at Boughton House, visit www.boughtonhouse.co.uk.

 

Gainsborough Heritage Centre: Work Hard Play Hard Exhibition

Gainsborough-Heritage-Centr

Gainsborough Heritage Centre

The Gainsborough Heritage Centre are holding a new exhibition called Work Hard Play Hard which will be starting on 26th September. This exhibition will showcase the sports played by local people, including teams from the Marshalls and Roses factories. The sports this exhibition will be exploring are football, cycling, tennis, cricket, hockey, golf, bowls and much more. Sport has always been a popular form of recreation within the town so come along and see if you can spot a relative or two.

The Centre on 12 North Street is open on Saturdays from 9am until 3pm and the 2nd and 4th Sundays of the month from 11am until 4pm. During the week the Centre is open on Tuesdays from 10am until 3pm. The exhibition entry fee is £1.50 to non-members of the Association. The standard yearly membership fee for members is £10 and the benefit of this is free entry to all of the Centre’s exhibitions.

Further details can be obtained about the Heritage Centre by email: chairman@gainsboroughheritage.com or visit www.gainsboroughheritage.com or call 01427 610526.

Write for us!

scribeFollowing the successful launch of the first edition of our magazine this summer, we are now planning issue two, which will appear around Christmas. This is an open call. Unlike issue one, which focussed on the English Civil War, and issue three (mid 2016), which will adopt the theme of ‘Hidden Voices’, every second issue of the magazine will take contributions on any topic relating to the history and heritage of the East Midlands area.

We’re looking for stories of between 2,000-2,500 words long, and news events/notices of up to 500 words. The cut-off date is mid Nov 2015. We actively encourage the inclusion of images, artwork, etc. Imagine a History Today for the East Midlands.

Please look at the East Midlands History & Heritage Style Sheet below before you start.

Please email with any questions/queries.

Nick Hayes (editor)

emhist@virginmedia.com

Download document (PDF)

The Montagu Monuments

montagumon

© Copyright Richard Croft and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

Four world-class marble sculptures in St Edmund’s Church in Warkton, Northamptonshire, that commemorate members of the Montagu family, have been restored following a year-long £500,000 project managed by The Prince’s Regeneration Trust.

Two of them were created by Louis Francois Roubiliac, who is considered to have been one of the greatest sculptors working in 18th century England.

The church will be open every Thursday from 10am to 2pm (and at the same times every day in August except for Sundays) throughout 2015 to allow the public to view the stunning pieces of art in all their restored glory.

Roman Southwell Gladiator Ale launched

gladiator-aleWelbeck Abbey Brewery is sponsoring the Roman Southwell Project by producing a special limited edition beer. The ‘Gladiator Ale’ will be a traditional pale ale made with British barley and Boudicea hops. The beer, which will be 3.8% ABV, will be available in local pubs in Southwell in late June.

The beer will also be available in an eight-pack case priced just £20 from late July onwards. Proceeds from the sales of the beer will go towards funding Phase Three of the project, due to start in October.

See the Roman Southwell Project website for more information.

Kings Clipstone Research Project

kingsclipstoneRunning for over 11 years now, the Kings Clipstone Research Project is now in the midst of its busiest year ever. The project is studying the landscape and built environment of the largest royal palace ever to have been constructed in Mediaeval England.

With a huge ground penetrating radar survey carried out this spring, 2015 will see over four weeks of excavation work taking place organised alongside Mercian Archaeological Services CIC and the Sherwood Forest Trust. There are plenty of volunteer and student placements available.

For more information on the project visit the Kings Clipstone Research Project Facebook page.

Mortality, Care and Military Welfare during the British Civil Wars

Healthcare1630s

Detail from ‘The Hospital’ by Jacques Callot (1633)

An international conference organised by the University of Leicester’s Centre for English Local History will celebrate the opening of the National Civil War Centre at Newark Museum, Nottinghamshire, on 7-8 August 2015. The conference will examine care and military welfare during the British Civil Wars, embracing themes such as hospitals, medicine, surgery, nursing, disease, wounds, maimed soldiers, war widows and orphans. It will also focus on the costs of these wars, as well as the social memory and lasting scars of this important series of conflicts. The conference also celebrates the establishment of a Wolfson Foundation Research Centre for Care, Welfare and Medicine during the British Civil Wars based at Newark Museum and in partnership with the University of Leicester.

Organiser Dr Andrew Hopper from Leicester University’s Centre for English Local History said:

“Some of the measures put in place during the civil war seem astonishingly modern.  Parliament led the way and its welfare provision care could be seen as both enlightened thinking, but also an inducement to fight for its cause.  It was certainly not a universal system. Pension rights were not extended to those who fought for the King – a situation reversed when King Charles II assumed the throne.  He also dismantled the military hospital structure and refused to accept the state’s duty for the welfare of its army, putting responsibility back upon parish poor relief and charities.”

For a full programme and information on how to register for one or both days visit www2.le.ac.uk/conference or email Dr Andrew Hopper at ajh69@le.ac.uk.

The £50 registration fee for both days includes free entry to the NCWC, buffet lunch and refreshments, and wine and real ale receptions thanks to support from Midland History and Springhead Brewery.

More information at: www.nationalcivilwarcentre.com

Twitter: @civilwarcentre

www.facebook.com/NationalCivilWarCentre

Haslam and Harvey Statues Centenary event, Chesterfield

114_1448In June The Nottinghamshire & Derbyshire Labour History Society is supporting several events for the Haslam and Harvey statues Centenary. The statues of William Harvey MP and James Haslam MP have been standing on plinths outside the former NUM offices in Saltergate, Chesterfield, for the past 100 years. The society is working with the Derbyshire Library Service and the Chesterfield Borough Council to use the centenary to celebrate the history of the Derbyshire miners.

The programme begins on Friday 26 June with a short ceremony outside the building at 7pm to unveil an interpretation board. Refreshments will be available in the Labour Club opposite the statues from 6pm, and after the ceremony until late.

On Saturday 27th June there are talks in the Chesterfield Library at 10 am about Haslam and Harvey, followed by a lunchtime buffet and a Round Table discussion on Derbyshire miners’ history. Events on both Friday and Saturday are free. If you want a buffet lunch for £8 on the Saturday 27 June, you will need to buy a ticket in advance at Chesterfield Library, tel. 01629 533400.

East Midlands History & Heritage Magazine, Issue 1!

EMHHJune2015coverThe English Civil War is the central theme of this issue – chosen to coincide with the opening of the new national Civil War Museum at Newark. Charles I always recognised this strategic importance of the region; it was in Nottingham that he chose to raise his standard on  22 August 1642. Bloody sieges followed, particularly at Newark, but also at Bolingbroke and Ashby-de-la-Zouch. Nottingham, Lincoln, Gainsborough became ‘frontier towns’, decisive engagements were fought at Naseby, Winceby and Willoughby on the Wolds. The East Midlands became the gateway through which rival armies passed; to deny access became a chief objective for both sides. War brought disease, treachery and heroism. Its social costs were high; its legacy in terms of destruction, disruption and disability was far reaching.

Read the magazine for more….