Category Archives: East Midlands

Write for us!

scribeFollowing the successful launch of the first edition of our magazine this summer, we are now planning issue two, which will appear around Christmas. This is an open call. Unlike issue one, which focussed on the English Civil War, and issue three (mid 2016), which will adopt the theme of ‘Hidden Voices’, every second issue of the magazine will take contributions on any topic relating to the history and heritage of the East Midlands area.

We’re looking for stories of between 2,000-2,500 words long, and news events/notices of up to 500 words. The cut-off date is mid Nov 2015. We actively encourage the inclusion of images, artwork, etc. Imagine a History Today for the East Midlands.

Please look at the East Midlands History & Heritage Style Sheet below before you start.

Please email with any questions/queries.

Nick Hayes (editor)

emhist@virginmedia.com

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Mortality, Care and Military Welfare during the British Civil Wars

Healthcare1630s

Detail from ‘The Hospital’ by Jacques Callot (1633)

An international conference organised by the University of Leicester’s Centre for English Local History will celebrate the opening of the National Civil War Centre at Newark Museum, Nottinghamshire, on 7-8 August 2015. The conference will examine care and military welfare during the British Civil Wars, embracing themes such as hospitals, medicine, surgery, nursing, disease, wounds, maimed soldiers, war widows and orphans. It will also focus on the costs of these wars, as well as the social memory and lasting scars of this important series of conflicts. The conference also celebrates the establishment of a Wolfson Foundation Research Centre for Care, Welfare and Medicine during the British Civil Wars based at Newark Museum and in partnership with the University of Leicester.

Organiser Dr Andrew Hopper from Leicester University’s Centre for English Local History said:

“Some of the measures put in place during the civil war seem astonishingly modern.  Parliament led the way and its welfare provision care could be seen as both enlightened thinking, but also an inducement to fight for its cause.  It was certainly not a universal system. Pension rights were not extended to those who fought for the King – a situation reversed when King Charles II assumed the throne.  He also dismantled the military hospital structure and refused to accept the state’s duty for the welfare of its army, putting responsibility back upon parish poor relief and charities.”

For a full programme and information on how to register for one or both days visit www2.le.ac.uk/conference or email Dr Andrew Hopper at ajh69@le.ac.uk.

The £50 registration fee for both days includes free entry to the NCWC, buffet lunch and refreshments, and wine and real ale receptions thanks to support from Midland History and Springhead Brewery.

More information at: www.nationalcivilwarcentre.com

Twitter: @civilwarcentre

www.facebook.com/NationalCivilWarCentre

East Midlands History & Heritage Magazine, Issue 1!

EMHHJune2015coverThe English Civil War is the central theme of this issue – chosen to coincide with the opening of the new national Civil War Museum at Newark. Charles I always recognised this strategic importance of the region; it was in Nottingham that he chose to raise his standard on  22 August 1642. Bloody sieges followed, particularly at Newark, but also at Bolingbroke and Ashby-de-la-Zouch. Nottingham, Lincoln, Gainsborough became ‘frontier towns’, decisive engagements were fought at Naseby, Winceby and Willoughby on the Wolds. The East Midlands became the gateway through which rival armies passed; to deny access became a chief objective for both sides. War brought disease, treachery and heroism. Its social costs were high; its legacy in terms of destruction, disruption and disability was far reaching.

Read the magazine for more….