Category Archives: Northamptonshire

East Midlands History & Heritage Magazine, Issue 2 out!

EMHHDec2015coverA wide variety of historical articles in the latest edition of East Midlands History & Heritage: letters from Charlie Clarke on the Western Front to his girlfriend back in Gainsborough; the trial and execution in 1823 of three men convicted of sodomy; defamation in Nottinghamshire in the early modern period; The Battle of Waterloo and Nottinghamshire’s ‘chosen men’; the Reformatory at Mount St. Bernard in Leicestershire; Magna Carta and the Uffington
Connection; discovering the Archaeology of Rufford Abbey Country Park 2013-2015; the Mayflower Pilgrims
in the East Midlands; Ellerslie House for Paralysed
Sailors and Soldiers in Nottingham.

Read the magazine ….

Take a part of the Northamptonshire archive home!

northantsphotoThe Northamptonshire Archive, based at Wootton Hall Park in Northampton, has launched a range of high quality products featuring selected images from the archive collection.  Exclusively available online , each item is produced to order and delivered to the customer’s address.

Whether it’s a quirky mug, some Christm
as cards or a beautiful framed print, there is something to suit all budgets.  Images currently available include vintage maps and Victorian Christmas cards – although the range will be extended.

The range can be seen at www.redbubble.com/people/northantspast

‘The Gunpowder Plot’ at Boughton House, Northants

gunpowder-plotNorthamptonshire’s Boughton House is reaffirming its role as the home of Bonfire Night with the return of sell-out show, The Gunpowder Plot.

Tickets have gone on sale in September for the Estate’s third annual spectacle of performance, projection and pyrotechnics in November.

The centuries old tradition of thanksgiving was reinstated on Bonfire Night at Boughton House in 2013 in tribute to Edward, First Lord Montagu of Boughton- the father of Bonfire Night.

Edward personally sponsored legislation known as The Observance of 5th November Act 1605, which called for an annual thanksgiving for the failure of The Plot to assassinate King James I of England – setting in motion a tradition which has spanned centuries.

The Estate, home now to Edward’s descendant, the Duke of Buccleuch, will become a backdrop to the event telling the thrilling story of Northamptonshire’s infamous conspirators, as the production, in association with Northamptonshire County Council and Leicester-based theatre innovators METRO-BOULOT-DODO, returns on November 5th, 6th and 7th.

The Gunpowder Plot takes place at Boughton Estate on November 5th, 6th and 7th. Tickets are on sale from Royal and Derngate (www.royalandderngate.co.uk) priced at £12.50 per adult and £8 for concessions.

For more information on upcoming events at Boughton House, visit www.boughtonhouse.co.uk.

 

The Montagu Monuments

montagumon

© Copyright Richard Croft and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

Four world-class marble sculptures in St Edmund’s Church in Warkton, Northamptonshire, that commemorate members of the Montagu family, have been restored following a year-long £500,000 project managed by The Prince’s Regeneration Trust.

Two of them were created by Louis Francois Roubiliac, who is considered to have been one of the greatest sculptors working in 18th century England.

The church will be open every Thursday from 10am to 2pm (and at the same times every day in August except for Sundays) throughout 2015 to allow the public to view the stunning pieces of art in all their restored glory.

East Midlands History & Heritage Magazine, Issue 1!

EMHHJune2015coverThe English Civil War is the central theme of this issue – chosen to coincide with the opening of the new national Civil War Museum at Newark. Charles I always recognised this strategic importance of the region; it was in Nottingham that he chose to raise his standard on  22 August 1642. Bloody sieges followed, particularly at Newark, but also at Bolingbroke and Ashby-de-la-Zouch. Nottingham, Lincoln, Gainsborough became ‘frontier towns’, decisive engagements were fought at Naseby, Winceby and Willoughby on the Wolds. The East Midlands became the gateway through which rival armies passed; to deny access became a chief objective for both sides. War brought disease, treachery and heroism. Its social costs were high; its legacy in terms of destruction, disruption and disability was far reaching.

Read the magazine for more….