Category Archives: Nottinghamshire

Content relating to the historic county of Nottinghamshire

Explore a virtual 19th century Nottingham textile factory at Sneinton on 9 July

victorian-textile-factory

Image courtesy of the Backlit Gallery

The Backlit Gallery in Sneinton is hosting a ‘immersive Virtual Reality experience’ on 9 July. By wearing a VR headset visitors will be able to explore the sights and sounds of the textile factory of I&R Morley as it looked in the late 19th century.

The VR experience is part of a day of events at Backlit on 9 July, from 12 noon to 5pm, which will be devoted to Sneinton and the life and legacy of Samuel Morley (1809-1886), a Nottingham MP, textile manufacturer, social reformer and philanthropist.

The Backlit Gallery is at Alfred House, Ashley Street, Sneinton, Nottingham NG3 1JG.
www.backlit.org.uk
www.morleythreads.com

‘The Labrador Companion’ by Captain George Cartwright

George Cartwright in Labrador

Three years ago, “The Labrador Companion” was discovered in Yorkshire. This is a previously unknown manuscript written by Captain George Cartwright (1739-1819) about his years spent in Labrador.  It is both an instructional text unlike any others related to the early fur trade in eastern North America, and it is also a text about natural history observations.

Cartwright was born at the manor house in Marnham, on the banks of the River Trent in Nottinghamshire, and went on to become a pioneer settler in Labrador in the far north east of Canada. He was nick-named ‘Labrador’ Cartwright having lived for nearly 16 years in these sub-arctic lands hunting and collecting animals and skins for export.

This annotated edition, published by McGill-Queen’s University Press, transcribes ‘The Labrador Companion’ in full. Cartwright documented the everyday work of Labrador’s particular kind of fur-trade life based on his experiences operating a series of merchant stations in southern Labrador between 1770 and 1786.

http://www.mqup.ca/george-cartwright—s-the-labrador-companion-products-9780773548060.php?page_id=105621&#!prettyPhoto

East Midlands History & Heritage Magazine, Issue 2 out!

EMHHDec2015coverA wide variety of historical articles in the latest edition of East Midlands History & Heritage: letters from Charlie Clarke on the Western Front to his girlfriend back in Gainsborough; the trial and execution in 1823 of three men convicted of sodomy; defamation in Nottinghamshire in the early modern period; The Battle of Waterloo and Nottinghamshire’s ‘chosen men’; the Reformatory at Mount St. Bernard in Leicestershire; Magna Carta and the Uffington
Connection; discovering the Archaeology of Rufford Abbey Country Park 2013-2015; the Mayflower Pilgrims
in the East Midlands; Ellerslie House for Paralysed
Sailors and Soldiers in Nottingham.

Read the magazine ….

Grave slab of Robert de Markham rediscovered

rufford-abbeyThe grave slab of a medieval monk who was buried at Rufford Abbey in Nottinghamshire has been rediscovered in English Heritage’s national collection store at Wrest Park in Bedfordshire.

The decorated slab commemorates Robert de Markham and dates from 1399. It was removed from the chapel at Rufford Abbey in the 1950s when the building was partially demolished.

Further details from the BBC Nottingham website.

Roman Southwell Gladiator Ale launched

gladiator-aleWelbeck Abbey Brewery is sponsoring the Roman Southwell Project by producing a special limited edition beer. The ‘Gladiator Ale’ will be a traditional pale ale made with British barley and Boudicea hops. The beer, which will be 3.8% ABV, will be available in local pubs in Southwell in late June.

The beer will also be available in an eight-pack case priced just £20 from late July onwards. Proceeds from the sales of the beer will go towards funding Phase Three of the project, due to start in October.

See the Roman Southwell Project website for more information.

Kings Clipstone Research Project

kingsclipstoneRunning for over 11 years now, the Kings Clipstone Research Project is now in the midst of its busiest year ever. The project is studying the landscape and built environment of the largest royal palace ever to have been constructed in Mediaeval England.

With a huge ground penetrating radar survey carried out this spring, 2015 will see over four weeks of excavation work taking place organised alongside Mercian Archaeological Services CIC and the Sherwood Forest Trust. There are plenty of volunteer and student placements available.

For more information on the project visit the Kings Clipstone Research Project Facebook page.

East Midlands History & Heritage Magazine, Issue 1!

EMHHJune2015coverThe English Civil War is the central theme of this issue – chosen to coincide with the opening of the new national Civil War Museum at Newark. Charles I always recognised this strategic importance of the region; it was in Nottingham that he chose to raise his standard on  22 August 1642. Bloody sieges followed, particularly at Newark, but also at Bolingbroke and Ashby-de-la-Zouch. Nottingham, Lincoln, Gainsborough became ‘frontier towns’, decisive engagements were fought at Naseby, Winceby and Willoughby on the Wolds. The East Midlands became the gateway through which rival armies passed; to deny access became a chief objective for both sides. War brought disease, treachery and heroism. Its social costs were high; its legacy in terms of destruction, disruption and disability was far reaching.

Read the magazine for more….

Nottinghamshire Archives reopens

strelley-court-roll-part2The Archives reopened on 28th April 2015, following a £2.5m investment to refurbish and extend the archives building.

The new look archives building now includes:

  • additional space to accommodate new archives for decades to come, including specialist storage for photographs and digital media
  • a computerised building management system
  • an additional new meeting room/multi-purpose learning space
  • improved computer suite for accessing digital heritage, with free public wi-fi throughout the building.

Opening times are Tuesdays 9am – 7pm, Wednesdays to Fridays 9am – 5pm and Saturdays 9am – 1pm.

A programme of events is planned – including an Archives Fun Day on 2nd May. More information is available from the Notts Archives website.

 

An edition of the Daybook of John Reddish, 1780-1805.

poor-jackThis publication is a digitised version of an M.Phil thesis by the late Ann Cockburn which was awarded in 1979.

The thesis concerns a manuscript notebook kept by the Reddish family, who kept a water mill at East Bridgford and were later framework knitters at Lowdham. The manuscript mostly contains music and the song lyrics, many evidently copied from broadside ballads. These are all transcribed in the thesis together with commentaries on related versions from elsewhere and possible sources. Sound recordings of 12 of the songs and tunes are also available for download as MP3 files. This is an important source of information on Nottinghamshire folk song.

The Daybook additionally includes some records of payments mentioning named individuals and a few family notes. These are not transcribed in the thesis, but photographic facsimilies of the daybook are also available to download from Nottingham eTheses. The original manuscript is now held by the Vaughan Williams Memorial Library, English Folk Dance and Song Society, London.

This quotation as been copied literatim from the final page of the manuscript:

Memmory of the Flood

on Wednesday the 11th of February 1795 Came up to the fish house thack within about 3 inches that side next y trent and I went to shelford mannor when it was just at the hight in John Millington’s Boat to help to fetch 199 sheep out of the water the property of Mr. Wm. Welson then tennat at Shelford Mannor.”

The digitised version of the thesis is available at etheses.nottingham.ac.uk/3962/.

Peter Millington